←Previous Lesson

Absolute Beginner > Lesson 10

Lesson 10. Korean Numbers (Sino & Pure)

There are two types of numbers in Korean – Sino and Pure (or Native.) 

Sino numbers are of Chinese origin, and pure numbers are based on native Korean.

They are used in different situations; Sino is used when counting floors, date, money, length, height, weight, etc., and Pure numbers are used when counting age, the number of people or things, etc.

In this lesson, we will focus on learning the numbers.

 

First, let’s start with Sino Korean numbers.

1 – 일 [il]

2 – 이 [ee]

3 – 삼 [sam]

4 – 사 [sa]

5 – 오 [o]

6 – 육 [yook]

7 – 칠 [chil]

8 – 팔 [pal]

9 – 구 [goo]

10 – 십 [shib]

These are the basic numbers that allow you to form bigger ones when combining them.

 

To form numbers from 11 to 19, you have to put 십 (10) first and then another number from 1 to 9, for example:

11 – 십일 [shib-il]

As you can see, it’s basically a combination of “10 + 1”.

12 – 십이 [sib-ee]

13 – 십삼 [shib-sam]

14 – 십사 [shib-sa]

15 – 십오 [shib-o]

16 – 십육 [shib-yook]

17 – 십칠 [shib-chil]

18 – 십팔 [shib-pal]

19 – 십구 [shib-goo]

 

If you want to say 20, you have to say “2х10”.

20 – 이십 [ee-shib]

21 – 이십일 [ee-shib-il]

22 – 이십이 [ee-shib-ee]

23 – 이십삼 [ee-shib-sam]

24 – 이십사 [ee-shib-sa]

25 – 이십오 [ee-shib-o]

26 – 이십육 [ee-shib-yook]

27 – 이십칠 [ee-shib-chil]

28 – 이십팔 [ee-shib-pal]

29 – 이십구 [ee-shib-goo]

 

The same pattern applies to the following numbers.

30 – 삼십 [sam-shib]

31 – 삼십일 [sam-shib-ol]

32 – 삼십일 [sam-shib-il]

32 – 삼십이 [sam-shib-ee]

33 – 삼십삼 [sam-shib-sam]

34 – 삼십사 [sam-shib-sa]

35 – 삼십오 [sam-shib-o]

36 – 삼십육 [sam-shib-yook]

37 – 삼십칠 [sa-shib-chil]

38 – 삼십팔 [sam-shib-pal]

39 – 삼십구 [sam-shib-goo]

40 – 사십 [sa-shib]

41 – 사십일 [sa-shib-il]

42 – 사십이 [sa-shib-ee]

43 – 사십삼 [sa-shib-sam]

44 – 사십사 [sa-shib-sa]

45 – 사십오 [sa-shib-o]

46 – 사십육 [sa-shib-yook]

47 – 사십칠 [sa-shib-chil]

48 – 사십팔 [sa-shib-pal]

49 – 사십구 [sa-shib-goo]

50 – 오십 [o-shib]

51 – 오십일 [o-shib-il]

52 – 오십이 [o-shib-ee]

53 – 오십삼 [o-shib-sam]

54 – 오십사 [o-shib-sa]

55 – 오십오 [o-shib-o]

56 – 오십육 [o-shib-yook]

57 – 오십칠 [o-shib-chil]

58 – 오십팔 [o-shib-pal]

59 – 오십구 [o-shib-goo]

60 – 육십 [yook-shib]

61 – 육십일 [yook-shib-il]

62 – 육십이 [yook-shib-ee]

63 – 육십삼 [yook-shib-sam]

64 – 육십사 [yook-shib-sa]

65 – 육십오 [yook-shib-o]

66 – 육십육 [yook-shib-yook]

67 – 육십칠 [yook-shib-chil]

68 – 육십팔 [yook-shib-pal]

69 – 육십구 [yook-shib-goo]

70 – 칠십 [chil-shib]

71 – 칠십일 [[chil-shib-il]

72 – 칠십이 [chil-shib-ee]

73 – 칠십삼 [chil-shib-sam]

74 – 칠십사 [chil-shib-sa]

75 – 칠십오 [chil-shib-o]

76 – 칠십육 [chil-shib-yook]

77 – 칠십칠 [chil-shib-chil]

78 – 칠십팔 [chil-shib-pal]

79 – 칠십구 [chil-shib-goo]

80 – 팔십 [pal-shib]

81 – 팔십일 [pal-shib-il]

82 – 팔십이 [pal-shib-ee]

83 – 팔십삼 [pal-shib-sam]

84 – 팔십사 [pal-shib-sa]

85 – 팔십오 [pal-shib-o]

86 – 팔십육 [pal-shib-yook]

87 – 팔십칠 [pal-shib-chil]

88 – 팔십팔 [pal-shib-pal]

89 – 팔십구 [pal-shib-goo]

90 – 구십 [goo-shib]

91 – 구십일 [goo-shib-il]

92 – 구십이 [goo-shib-ee]

93 – 구십삼 [goo-shib-sam]

94 – 구십사 [goo-shib-sa]

95 – 구십오 [goo-shib-o]

96 – 구십육 [goo-shib-yook]

97 – 구십칠 [goo-shib-chil]

98 – 구십팔 [goo-shib-pal]

99 – 구십구 [goo-shib-goo]

100 – 백 [baek]

101 – 백일 [baek-il]

102 – 백이 [baek-ee]

103 – 백삼 [baek-sam]

104 – 백사 [baek-sa]

105 – 백오 [baek-o]

106 – 백육 [baek-yook]

107 – 백칠 [baek-chil]

108 – 백팔 [baek-pal]

109 – 백구 [baek-goo]

110 – 백십일 [baek-shib-il]

200 – 이백 [ee-baek]

300 – 삼백 [sam-baek]

400 – 사백 [sa-baek]

500 – 오백 [o-baek]

600 – 육백 [yook-baek]

700 – 칠백 [chil-baek]

800 – 팔백 [pal-baek]

900 – 구백 [goo-baek]

999 – 구백구십구 [goo-baek-goo-shib-goo]

…and so on.

 

Now, let’s learn how to form four-figure numbers.

1000 – 천 [chun]

1001 – 천일 [chun-il]

1096 – 천구십오 [chun-goo-shib-o]

1403 – 천삼백삼 [chun-sam-baek-sam]

1682 – 천육백팔십이 [chun-yook-baek-pal-shib-ee]

1790 – 천칠백구십 [chun-chil-baek-goo-shib]

2000 – 이천 [ee-chun]

3000 – 삼천 [sam-chun]

4000 – 사천 [sa-chun]

5000 – 오천 [o-chun]

6000 – 육천 [yook-chun]

7000 – 칠천 [chil-chun]

8000 – 팔천 [pal-chun]

9000 – 구천 [goo-chun]

2019 – 이천십구 [ee-chun-shib-goo]

3456 – 삼천사백오십육 [sam-chun-sa-baek-o-shib-yook]

9876 – 구천팔백칠십육 [goo-chun-pal-baek-chil-shib-yook]

10000 – 만 [mahn]

20000 – 이만 [ee-mahn]

30000 – 삼만 [sam-mahn]

40000 – 사만 [sa-mahn]

50000 – 오만 [o-mahn]

60000 – 육만 [yook-mahn]

70000 – 칠만 [chil-man]

80000 – 팔만 [pal-mahn]

90000 – 구만 [goo-mahn]

52391 – 오만 이천 삼백 구십 일 [o-mahn-ee-chun-sam-baek-goo-shib-il]

86400 – 팔만 육천 사백 [pal-mahn-yook-chun-sa-baek]

100000 – 십만 [shib-man]

110000 – 십일만 [shib-il-mahn]

120000 – 십이만 [shib-ee-mahn]

130000 – 십삼만 [shib-sam-mahn]

140000 – 십사만 [shib-sa-mahn]

150000 – 십오만 [shib-o-mahn]

160000 – 십육만 [shib-yook-mahn]

170000 – 십칠만 [shib-chil-mahn]

180000 – 십팔만 [shib-pal-mahn]

190000 – 십구만 [shib-goo-mahn]

999999 – 구십구만구천구백구십구 [goo-shib-goo-mahn-goo-chun-goo-baek-goo-shib-goo]

1000000 – 백만 [baek-mahn]

 

Now, let’s look at Pure Korean numbers.

There are not that many numbers, because only the numbers from 1 to 99 have Pure names.

1 – 하나 [hana]

2 – 둘 [dool]

3 – 셋 [set]

4 – 넷 [net]

5 – 다섯 [da-sut]

6 – 여섯 [yuh-sut]

7 – 일곱 [il-gob]

8 – 여덟 [yuh-dul]

9 – 아홉 [a-hop]

10 – 열 [yeol]

 

Unlike Sino names like 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90, each of these numbers has its own unique name in Pure names.

20 – 스물 [seu-mool]

30 – 서른 [suh-leun]

40 – 마흔 [ma-heun]

50 – 쉰 [shwin]

60 – 예순 [ye-soon]

70 – 일흔 [il-heun]

80 – 여든 [yuh-deun]

90 – 아흔 [a-heun] 

If you know these numbers, you can easily form others. The principle is the same as with Sino numbers.

11 – 열하나 [yeol-hana]

12 – 열둘 [yeol-dool]

13 – 열셋 [yeol-set]

14 – 열넷 [yeol-net]

15 – 열다섯 [yeol-daseot]

16 – 열여섯 [yeol-yeosut]

17 – 열일곱 [yeol-ilgob]

18 – 열여덟 [yeol-yeodel]

19 – 열아홉 [yeol-ahob]

20 – 스물 [seu-mool]

21 – 스물하나 [seumool-hana]

…and so on.

32 – 서른 둘 [seoreun-dool]

45 – 마흔다섯 [maheun-dasut]

53 – 쉰셋 [shwin-set]

66 – 예순여섯 [yesoon-yeosut]

77 – 일흔일곱 [ilheun-ilgob]

88 – 여든여덜 [yeodeun-yeodul]

99 – 아흔아홉 [aheun-ahob]

 

And finally, let’s learn how to say “zero”.

Sino: 0 – 영 [young]

Pure: 0 – 공 [gong] or 빵 [bbang]

Congratulations! You’ve finished all the lessons in Absolute Beginner Course!